Browse Exhibits (4 total)

Abolaji Amosu

IMG_3536.jpg

Born in Lagos Nigeria in 2000, Abolaji Amosu grew up in an upper-middle-class family of six. After her father convinced her mother to experience a new life in the United States, the family arrived in Philadelphia in 2006. Forced to repeat the third grade, Amosu pushed herself to defy stereotypes associated with Africans and excelled in her studies. In her interview, Amosu describes growing up in America as a Nigerian immigrant, how she struggled with her cultural identity, and how both impacted her studies and social life.  

, ,

Ana Maria Roldan

roldan_OH.jpg

When Ana Maria Roldan was fourteen years old she came to the United States from Puerto Rico, because her parents wanted to protect her from an older suitor and to provide a better life for her and her siblings. After finishing high school in Boston, she married and had two children, whom she then raised as a single mother, and came out as gay. After her kids became adults, Ana moved to Philadelphia with her life partner. There, she found her home away from home. 

, ,

Gilda Cetrullo

Cover_image_from_Canzoni_Abruzzesi_(1919).PNG

Gilda Cemi Cetrullo (b. 1903) was 17 when she left Abruzzi, Italy, to join her parents in Philadelphia. In her 1982 interview Cetrullo talked about her life in Italy and the United States, including her long separation from her family, her first impressions of Philadelphia, her education and work experiences, life as an illegal immigrant in the U.S., and raising a family.

, ,

Min “Mandy” Wang

phlim_wang_m_image02.JPG

Min “Mandy” Wang (b. 1986) grew up in Liuyang, China, where she worked in the local fireworks factories before attending Central South University Forestry and Technology in nearby Changsha City. There, she also met her Chinese-American husband. After giving birth to their son in Hong Kong, so that he could have dual citizenship, Min in 2018 joined her husband in Philadelphia. Today, she dreams of moving to the suburbs and making enough money to send her children to a good school, so that they can take full advantage of the opportunities available in America.

, ,